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Coakley Inducted into ICSA Hall of Fame, Honored with Student Leadership Award

Coakley Inducted into ICSA Hall of Fame, Honored with Student Leadership Award

NORFOLK, Va. – After a remarkable tenure, Harvard sailing senior Kevin Coakley has been inducted into the Inter-Collegiate Sailing Association (ICSA) Hall of Fame for his contributions to the sport of college sailing, as announced by the conference yesterday.

The ICSA Hall of Fame was established in 1969 to honor individuals for either undergraduate competitive achievement in sailing or outstanding leadership and service to the establishment, development and growth of the sport.

Coakley was also presented with the James Rousmaniere Award for Student Leadership during his induction. This award recognizes an undergraduate for extraordinary achievement in leadership whose efforts have made a significant contribution to the development, progress and success of his or her club or team, conference or the ICSA. This is the first time in program history that this award, named after a Harvard 1940 alum, was given to a Harvard sailor.

"As a freshman he filled in for the secretary of the conference at the Annual Meeting and since that time he has served as an At-Large Rep, Secretary and President on the Executive committee," stated head coach Mike O'Conner.

"He is also a great leader on our team. He is the person I go to when I need something done. I have also been able to count on him to keep me apprise of any non-athletic issues that might affect his teammates".

The Duxbury, Mass. native was honored previously this season with the NEISA Student-Leadership Award. This award recognizes extraordinary leadership and achievement by an undergraduate whose efforts have made a significant contribution to the development, progress, and success of his or her team, conference or the ICSA.

Coakley will graduate from Harvard this spring with a concentration in economics.

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