PRINCIPLED LEADERSHIPACADEMIC INTEGRATION COMPETITIVE EXCELLENCE

No. 19/21 Harvard Thumps Yale, 38-19, to Claim Third-Straight Ivy Title

Photo courtesy of Gil Talbot.

NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- No. 19/21 Harvard took down Yale, 38-19, in front of 51,126 fans at the Yale Bowl Saturday evening. The win gave Harvard a share of its third-straight Ivy League championship, marking the first time in school history the program has accomplished the feat.

Senior quarterback Scott Hosch broke the Harvard (9-1, 6-1 Ivy League) single-season passing record with 320 yards to give him 2,827 for the year, also tying the record for most touchdown passes in The Game with four.  Hosch also moved into a tie for second place on the single-season Harvard passing touchdowns list with 22. Freshman Justice Shelton-Mosley scored three times while tallying 127 yards of offense on six touches.

Tim Murphy, the Thomas Stephenson Family Head Coach for Harvard Football, picked up his 17th win in the series over Yale to give him the most wins for any coach in series history. Harvard's nine-consecutive victories in the series is the longest for either team in the 132-year history of The Game.

On the opening drive, Yale (6-4, 3-4 Ivy League) moved the ball down the field, as Morgan Roberts was 4-of-6 before going for it all on a 4th-and-12 at the Crimson 28-yard line. The Eli quarterback found Christopher Williams-Lopez in the end zone to move the Bulldogs ahead, 7-0.

The Crimson answered immediately, as senior Asante Gibson gave Harvard solid field position with a 24-yard kick return to the Harvard 46. On the third play of the drive, Hosch found Shelton-Mosley for a 53-yard completion down the middle to knot the game, 7-7, with 10:31 left in the stanza.

After both teams failed to get on the board again in the first quarter, Harvard used a five-play 66-yard drive to go ahead by seven, 14-7, on its first drive of the second quarter. A pass interference call on Yale moved the Crimson to its 38-yard line before senior Tanner Wrisley pulled one in for 14 yards. The Crimson capped the drive with a 35-yard connection between Hosch and Shelton-Mosley, their second of the day. The wide receiver earned 22 yards after the catch to give Harvard its first lead of the day.

Harvard expanded its lead to 21-7 with a nine-play drive that started from its 11-yard line and ended at the 2:27 mark before the half. Junior Anthony Firkser moved the ball into Yale territory with a diving, one-handed catch, and three plays later, Hosch found senior Ben Braunecker in the back of the end zone for an 18-yard completion and six more points.

Yale failed to add to its tally just before the half, as the Crimson defense stopped the Elis on the 13-yard line and the Bulldogs missed the field goal attempt wide right.

The Crimson picked up where it left off in the second half, adding seven more to its tally on the first drive of the game. Seitu and Semar Smith combined for 23 rushing yards on the series and Hosch tossed to Braunecker for a score from the two-yard line. Kenny Smart added a 42-yard field goal with 3:48 to play in the period to put the Crimson up, 31-7.

Robert kept the ball for a two-yard rush at 14:11 in the fourth quarter to add six points to the board for Yale. The two-point conversion was no good to keep the Bulldogs at an 18-point disadvantage.

Shelton-Mosley scored for a third time with 5:25 remaining in the fourth quarter, taking a fly sweep eight yards into the corner of the end zone. The touchdown was his first-career score on the ground and gave Harvard a 25-point cushion, 38-13.

Yale scored with just over three minutes left to play in the fourth when Roberts found Stephen Buric for six points. The ensuing two-point conversion failed, leaving Harvard with a 38-19 advantage.

The victory was Harvard's 15th-straight away from Cambridge, setting a new program record, and the Harvard senior class finished their careers at 36-4 to match the class of 2015 for most wins during the Ivy era (since 1956).

PRINCIPLED LEADERSHIP, ACADEMIC INTEGRATION AND COMPETITIVE EXCELLENCE