ACADEMIC INTEGRATION COMPETITIVE EXCELLENCE

IN DIVISION I ATHLETICS

 

Amaker To Remain at Harvard

Tommy Amaker led the Crimson to its first Ivy League title in 2010-11 (Gil Talbot).

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – Tommy Amaker, who guided Harvard to its first Ivy League championship and its winningest season in program history with 23 victories in 2010-11, will remain as head men’s basketball coach.

“I am appreciative of and flattered by the interest shown in me by other fine universities, but I am proud and honored to represent Harvard,” said Amaker. “I look forward to continuing my efforts to teach, lead and serve at this great institution.”

In just four seasons at the helm of the Crimson, Amaker has led Harvard to it’s first-ever Ivy title, its two winningest seasons in program history, two consecutive postseason appearances (after one previous postseason appearance in the history of the program) and many program records.  Amaker’s Crimson have defeated five BCS Conference teams, and he was honored as the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) All-District Coach of the Year this past season.

After guiding Harvard to a 21-8 record and a berth in the CollegeInsider.com Tournament (CIT) in 2009-10, the Crimson won a program-best 23 games this past season and set new team highs in conference victories (12) and home wins (14). Harvard, which defeated Boston College for the third straight season and also downed Colorado, earned a share of its first Ivy League title by beating Princeton, 79-67, March 5. Harvard also posted a perfect record at home, going 14-0 at Lavietes Pavilion throughout the season.

Following the regular season, the Crimson participated in an Ivy League playoff for the first time and earned a berth in the National Invitation Tournament (NIT), also a program first, becoming the first Ivy League school to play in the NIT since 2003. Amaker was honored as a finalist for the Hugh Durham Award, given to the top mid-major coach in Division I basketball this past season and  has been a finalist for the Ben Jobe Award, presented annually to the top minority coach in Division I college basketball for the last two seasons.