$webstie.profile.siteName

@HarvardCrimson Harvard Edu
 

Wright Named to Lou Henson All-America Team

Keith Wright was second in the Ivy League with 12 double-doubles (Gil Talbot).

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – Junior forward Keith Wright, who earned Ivy League Player of the Year honors and was tabbed unanimously to the All-Ivy first team, was named to the Lou Henson All-America team Friday.

Wright, a co-captain of the Crimson from Suffolk, Va., was also recently tabbed to the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) All-District first team and was named the College Insider Ivy Player of the Year, as well as the Rush The Court All-Ivy team. He led Harvard in scoring and rebounding with 14.8 points per game and 8.3 rebounds per contest. Wright, who was second in the Ivy with 12 double-doubles, stood third in the league in scoring and second in rebounding.

Wright started all 30 games and reached double figures in scoring in all but three games and scored double digits in the final 15 games of the season. He paced Harvard with 54 blocks, which ranks second in school history for a single season. He also stood 15th in the country with a .584 shooting percentage. In Ivy League action, Wright averaged 15.4 ppg, 8.9 rpg and 2.1 bpg.

Wright and the Crimson posted a 23-7 overall record and went 12-2 in Ivy League games. Harvard earned a share of the program's first Ivy League title and earned a berth in the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) for the first time in school history.

The 2011 Lou Henson Player of the Year will be announced at the CollegeInsider.com awards banquet on April 1 in Houston, site of the men's basketball championship.

The Lou Henson Award is presented annually to the top Mid-Major player in Division I college basketball. The award is named in honor of Lou Henson who retired after a spectacular coaching career that lasted 41 years. When he left the game in 2005 he was sixth all-time in career Division I wins with 779. He is the winningest coach at both Illinois and New Mexico State. He is one of only 12 coaches in the history of the game to take two schools to the Final Four.